Honour a Loved One through a Candlelight Fund

November is the month of Remembrance for the Catholic community. It is a time during which we pray for our departed loved ones. Southwark just honoured those who have passed away this past weekend with our Memorial Mass at The Holy Family Parish in Sanderstead.  One way to honour their legacy would be to set up a Candlelight Fund.  

This November marked the 100th anniversary of the end of  World War I. We honour and remember all who had lost their lives, their loved ones or know anyone who suffered at the expense of the War. It is also a time to honour our close relatives and friends who passed away. If you would like to set up a lasting tribute to a loved one or continue their legacy, hear from a CAFOD supporter on what her Candlelight fund means to her.

Kathy’s Candlelight Fund for her son Robbie

Kathy who has opened a Candlelight fund for her son Robbie

Kathy who has opened a Candlelight fund for her son Robbie

Kathleen says: “I lost my only son, Robbie Sharp, in 2009, who lived with cerebral palsy from birth. Robbie needed lots of love, care and attention, which he was never short of. I was so grateful to all the volunteers who had helped Robbie, a few years later I wanted to put something back into the community.” A couple of years after her son Robbie died, Kathleen decided to turn her grief into something positive and set up a Candlelight Fund in Robbie’s memory

“Robbie was a wonderful young man and it is a great comfort to me to see that his memory is living on and he would be very happy to know that he is helping people around the world. There are also annual Candlelight Masses around the country and I have attended one locally which was very memorable. Robbie’s candlelight fund has raised over £6470 now.”

Set-up your own Candlelight funds 

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Become a Parish Volunteer and help eradicate poverty

Interested in making a difference to the World’s poorest communities? Join CAFOD as a parish volunteer and discover fantastic ways to make that difference. Two of our volunteers, Jill and John,  share the opportunities they gained from volunteering at CAFOD. You too can sign up today and get active in your parish.

Jill and John’s journey to becoming a parish volunteers

There are many reasons why parishioners choose to volunteer for CAFOD, from wanting to take concrete action to making the most of their free time.

Jill Cass, parish Volunteer from St Theresa of the Infant Jesus in BIGGIN HILL, at the Share the Journey walk last June 2018 in Hartley

Jill Cass, parish Volunteer from St Theresa of the Infant Jesus in Biggin Hill, at the Share the Journey walk last June 2018 in Hartley

Jill Cass became a volunteer in her parish by accident four years ago, when she had to fill in for someone else. “I have been a CAFOD volunteers for four years. In the past we had relied on a speaker at mass for Family Fast Day but one day we could not get one so I thought I would do it and that’s how I became a volunteer,” she says.

Since then, Jill has enjoyed being an active member of her community and has helped with a range of activities, from coordinating CAFOD’s Family Fast Days to helping other volunteers speak at mass.

On the other hand, a long time supporter of CAFOD, John Vine decided to become an active parish volunteer after retiring.

“I have supported CAFOD financially for as long as I can remember but when I retired I felt I needed to do more to follow St James’s exhortation to do something and not just talk about it.  So I decided to become our parish representative and set up a small parish group to help fundraise and support campaigns,” he says.

Interested in volunteering with CAFOD? Find out more

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How water pollution affects communities in Uganda and what you can do about it.

On Saturday 8th of September, we held a briefing for all CAFOD parish volunteers regarding our upcoming Harvest Family Fast Day. Mark Chamberlain was in attendance as our guest speaker for this occasion, sharing his knowledge about the water pollution crisis in Uganda. Ian Heams, from Mary Immaculate and St. Gregory Parish in High Barnet, writes about his experience at this event.

Longora collects water in her village, Moroto, Uganda.

Longora collects water in her village, Moroto, Uganda.

“In a detailed and passionate address to CAFOD supporters, Mark Chamberlain outlined the essential nature of water. He described the vital choices that have to be made in the absence of this common liquid that we so often take for granted here in the UK.”

The issue with water pollution in Uganda

“Focusing on the plight of people in the remote northern village of Moroto Uganda, Mark demonstrated the reasons why this issue has become the subject of this year’s Harvest appeal.

Find out how you can contribute to this year’s Harvest Family Fast Day

Mark recounted how the village population had been reduced to drinking the meagre supply of heavily polluted water from a nearby stream. He told the story of how this situation affected Longora, a pregnant woman expecting her child’s imminent birth during a four-year long drought.”

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