Get inspired by St Mary’s World Gifts celebration.

Unsure what to get someone this holiday season? Consider putting a smile on everyone’s face by purchasing a world gift. See how St. Mary’s organised a bake sale to purchase a community water supply World Gift. By advertising CAFOD‘s World Gifts, we can change the lives of those in need.

parish coffee

St. Mary’s coffee team enjoying Irish Coffees at their wonderous bake sale!

This past weekend, St. Mary’s in Clapham hosted a bake sale for World Gifts! All the proceeds are going towards a fund for a water supply for an entire community! This is a great way to get the whole parish involved and raise money for World Gifts. St. Mary’s sold cakes, brownies and all kinds of desserts that were enjoyed by all. They also had a coffee team on duty who were mixing delicious coffee to enjoy with their desserts. This is an amazing way to bring people together for the holidays and positively change communities.

A community water supply will cost £750, and will supply a constant source of clean water for many people. One example of this World Gift in action was in Uganda when CAFOD was able to fix a waterhole, provide the training and the necessary tools to Cecilia’s community with the proceeds from CAFOD’s community water gift. Cecilia says, “Now we have enough water for food, to clean ourselves and our clothes, and for our animals to drink.” World Gifts such as these will have a lasting impact and can change the lives of many.

Congratulations to St. Mary’s in Clapham, they raised over £600 at their bake sale! This is fantastic!

Check out World Gifts Today

What are World Gifts?

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‘On the Move’ helps young people share a refugee’s journey

On the Move’ is an exciting interactive way for children and young people to share a refugee family’s journey to safety. It is a great way for our young people to experience a little of what it means to leave your home and seek refuge in another country.

Students working on the 'On the Move' exercises. They were prompted to work as a family and learn what a refugee's journey would look like.

Students working on the ‘On the Move’ exercises. They were prompted to work as a family and learn what a refugee’s journey would look like.

As part of a day organised by Southwark Diocesan Education Commission, helped by CAFOD School Volunteers, students were invited to take part in the ‘On the Move’ activity. Maria Chiara, a CAFOD volunteer from Italy joined the children and here she describes how they were led through a family’s journey to safety.

“The young people were grouped into refugee families and chose who would be mum, dad, granny or children.

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How water pollution affects communities in Uganda and what you can do about it.

On Saturday 8th of September, we held a briefing for all CAFOD parish volunteers regarding our upcoming Harvest Family Fast Day. Mark Chamberlain was in attendance as our guest speaker for this occasion, sharing his knowledge about the water pollution crisis in Uganda. Ian Heams, from Mary Immaculate and St. Gregory Parish in High Barnet, writes about his experience at this event.

Longora collects water in her village, Moroto, Uganda.

Longora collects water in her village, Moroto, Uganda.

“In a detailed and passionate address to CAFOD supporters, Mark Chamberlain outlined the essential nature of water. He described the vital choices that have to be made in the absence of this common liquid that we so often take for granted here in the UK.”

The issue with water pollution in Uganda

“Focusing on the plight of people in the remote northern village of Moroto Uganda, Mark demonstrated the reasons why this issue has become the subject of this year’s Harvest appeal.

Find out how you can contribute to this year’s Harvest Family Fast Day

Mark recounted how the village population had been reduced to drinking the meagre supply of heavily polluted water from a nearby stream. He told the story of how this situation affected Longora, a pregnant woman expecting her child’s imminent birth during a four-year long drought.”

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