Write to your MP and be a voice for the voiceless.

Your local MP is your link to Parliament. They influence decisions which affect the future of the world’s poorest people. We are looking for people who are willing to write to their MP a couple of times a year.  A CAFOD MP Correspondent (MPC) ensures that the voices of the world’s poorest are heard in the corridors of power. So please consider signing up here.

Thomas Kimaru and Fiona in Parliament for Power to Be campaign

Thomas Kimaru and Fiona campaigning in Parliament

If you would like to find out more about the role  of an MPC then please come to  a training session on Tuesday 5th December at Amigo Hall next to St George’s Cathedral London SE1 7HY from 11am to 15.00pm with a shared lunch at 1.00pm. Come along to pick up some top lobbying tips and to:

  • Find out the latest insider information from parliament.
  • Discover top tips from the experts on how best to build a relationship with your MP.
  • Hear about CAFOD’s upcoming campaign plans
  • Meet and share ideas with like-minded campaigners.

Please sign up here for the training. 

We would also like you to use this as an opportunity for you to build up your relationship with your MP. Last year thousands of CAFOD supporters wrote messages of welcome, respect and love for refugees around the world. These will be displayed in Parliament in an exhibition during this week. Invite your MP to meet you in parliament after the training and see the exhibition together.

‘Fairtrade’ not ‘Fairly Traded’ – Andy Wansbury’s fight to keep Tea Farmers independent.

Andy Wansbury of St Thomas More in the Blexley Deanery is an ardent supporter of the Fairtrade ethos. He kindly shared with us his persistent challenge of the management of Sainsbury’s Crayford which is the largest branch in the country – over it’s use of the brand ‘Fairly Traded’ instead of the original ‘Fairtrade’. Read and see how Andy takes action and builds on the ongoing campaign “Don’t Ditch Fairtrade”.

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Andy Wansbury in front of Sainsbury’s Crayford

“When I first heard about Sainsbury’s replacing “Fairtrade” tea with “Fairly Traded” tea I was concerned because I normally shopped at Sainsbury’s.  I thought for a long time about how best to respond and then it occurred to me to use the Sainsbury’s feedback website “Tell Sainsbury’s”.  I spoke first to CAFOD, who advised me it would be better to write to the store manager, as this brings the issue to the attention to more of Sainsbury’s staff and not just those in the customer service department.

Before writing I checked out “Fairly Traded” tea in my local branch of Sainsbury’s, which is Crayford, the biggest branch in the country.  There was no Fairtrade tea on sale that day but there was plenty of Red Label “Fairly Traded” tea on sale.  Before leaving the store I asked for the store manager’s email address and explained why I wanted it.

To make sure I had all the relevant facts I researched “Fairly Traded” v Fairtrade on the internet; there were lots of useful information from the many supporters of the Fairtrade movement.  I found several suggested pro-forma letters (including CAFOD’s letter).  Inspired by them I composed my own letter in which I explained why I opposed Sainsbury’s dropping of the Fairtrade mark in favour “Fairly Traded”.  I detailed many of the concerns that are being raised about “Fairly Traded” v Fairtrade and asked Sainsbury’s to reverse their decision to drop Fairtrade.  I emailed the letter to the Crayford Store manager and placed a copy on the “Tell Sainsbury’s” feedback website.

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‘Fairtrade’ not ‘Fairly Traded’

I received a very bland initial reply from Sainsbury’s customer services department: it ignored almost all of the issues I raised.  I responded to Sainsbury’s asking them to clarify their answers and respond to items they had ignored.  I received a further reply expanding on a few points but still ignoring others.  I again challenge Sainsbury’s asking them to clarify some points and to answer the points that they had ignored.  Sainsbury’s replied saying they had given me an answer and would not give me a further answer.  I replied politely expressing my disappointment at their inability / refusal to answer all of the points I made.

The points which Sainsbury’s will not respond to include the fact that the use of the “Fairly Traded” term is confusing and is misleading customers in to thinking that “Fairly Traded” is the same as or is part of Fairtrade. They will not respond to the points made in the open letter from the Tea Farmers, this includes issues like farmers do not want Sainsbury’s to drop Fairtrade in favour of “Fairly Traded”, the farmers have a 50% share in the ownership of Fairtrade, and it is the farmers themselves who decide how to spend the premium that is paid on Fairtrade products.  In contrast, in Sainsbury’s “Fairly Traded” scheme the farmers have no ownership in any part of the scheme; they have to apply for money for projects to Sainsbury’s, who will then decide if the farmers can have money to spend on projects.

Sainsbury's Fairtrade protest

Campaigners outside the Sainsbury’s AGM have a clear message: Don’t ditch Fairtrade on its own-brand tea

When I wrote to Sainsbury’s I made the point that the Fairtrade system empowers the farmers because they are trusted to make their decisions on how best spend the Fairtrade premium where as the “Fairly Traded” scheme disempowered the farmers because they are required to submit their plans for projects for scrutiny before they can access the “Fairly Traded” premium.  Sainsbury’s reply shocked me “There are differing views on what empowerment means”.  Based on my understanding – if you take away a person’s ability to decide for themselves you disempower and disenfranchise them.

I am about to contact Trading Standards because term “Fairly Traded” is so close to Fairtrade that it confusing customers and misleading them into thinking that “Fairly Traded” tea is the same thing as or part of Fairtrade.  I wait to see how Trading Standards will respond.

In the Swahili language, ‘Kujichagulia’ means self-determination. Andy Wansbury is one of many who are fighting for the rights of Tea Farmers to remain self-determining. He strongly questions Sainsbury’s appropriation of the ‘Fairly Traded’ brand which is easily confused with the original ‘Fairtrade’ identifying mark of the indigenous Tea Farmers worldwide. Andy is spurred to action and he’ll interrogate the appropriateness of the use of the Fairly Traded label.

If you have been inspired and motivated by Andy’s determination to make right this injustice find out more now and take part in the day of action on 28 October.

Raise Your Voice and Speak Up For CAFOD!

Sarah, a CAFOD Media Volunteer, provides information about an upcoming CAFOD event. 

Are you looking to inspire others and motivate them by speaking up for CAFOD? Then you are in luck as your chance to attend a Speaking at Mass training session.

Join us on Saturday 9 September, for our Essentials Day, where you will be able to take

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Professional coach training

part in our Speaking at Mass training session as well as other sessions we have on offer. The event will start at 9:30 if you would like to join us for refreshments or 10:00 when the event will begin, lasting until 3:15. The event will take place in Romero House, 55 Westminster Bridge Rd, London SE1 7JB. Please feel free to bring your family and friends, with a bring and share lunch!

Speaking at Mass is the best way for all your parishioners to hear how their continuous support is improving the lives of their brothers and sisters across the globe. This year you will gain top tips about how lending your voice will encourage other parishioners to follow in your footsteps and speak up for CAFOD.

By Speaking at Mass, you will be informing your fellow parishioners about CAFOD partners and how they are supporting those who are living in poor communities by tackling poverty and injustice.

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Volunteers at a Speaking at Mass training

Not only do these talks provide with essentials skills which can be used in your everyday life, but they raise awareness of CAFOD’s work, in which also motivates and inspires others to get involved as volunteers. In doing so, CAFOD will get the support it needs to continue to spread the message and provide for others who live in some of the world’s poorest communities.

Do not worry if you are not a regular speaker, you do not even have to be a speaker at all! Just come along and listen in to the tips provided. You never know, maybe the talk can encourage you sign up to become a Speaker at Mass.

Book your place by:

Visiting Eventbrite 

Emailing: southwark@cafod.org.uk

Calling: 02084 66 99 01

Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity!