What the Stations of the Cross mean to me

Rachelle Thevathas, CAFOD parish volunteer at Holy Cross church in CATFORD, has organised the Station of the Cross in her parish. She told us what it meant for her .

When I was approached by a member of my Parish to lead the stations of the cross as CAFOD parish volunteer – I was thrilled!

The stations of the Cross help me to reflect on Jesus’ final journey

Stations of the Cross at Holy Cross in Catford

Stations of the Cross at Holy Cross in Catford

For me the stations of the cross is a great way of reflecting Jesus’ final journey, and his great sacrifice; it allows me to evaluate my life and my choices and puts into perspective the greatness of sacrifice and fasting. At times I associate the word fasting with food – however giving up my time for something – CAFOD volunteering for example – or someone, going out of my way to do a good deed for another are all examples of fasting – I give up a part of myself for other people.

Discover how I organised the Stations of the Cross at Holy Cross

Don Lazaro's artisan workshop, painting CAFOD's Romero El Salvador crosses.

Don Lazaro’s artisan workshop, painting CAFOD’s Romero El Salvador crosses.

I gave a call to the Southwark CAFOD office to get some ideas. I discovered that all the resources were on CAFOD website : a power point with pictures and a word document to organise the Stations of the Cross. 

I decided to only use the leader’s notes.  On the day, we had two alter severs walk around the church, from station to station. Using CAFOD’s resources I and another speaker talked through each station – giving a bible reading that linked to the station, and a brief reflection where we meditated on our thoughts, and then finished each station with a small prayer.

I reflected on CAFOD’s project

Whilst doing the Stations of the cross in my parish, I was able to reflect on CAFOD’s project in Zimbabwe; the sacrifices the people there must undergo without a choice, really put into perspective how fortunate and lucky I am.

In what ways does Jesus’s final journey affect you?

This Holy Week meditate on Jesus’ journey to the cross with our brothers and sisters around the world.

Get inspired by St. Augustine’s superb soup lunch

Oliver Meade is an office volunteer at the CAFOD Southwark volunteer centre.  In this blog, he writes about two soup lunches that took place in St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Tunbridge Wells, as well as how you can organise your own soup lunch.

Two incredible soup days

St Augustine's delicious butternut squash soup for Family Fast Day this Lent 2018

St Augustine’s delicious butternut squash soup for Family Fast Day this Lent 2018

The Justice and Peace group in St Augustine dished up mouth-watering soups on CAFOD Family Fast Day.  The delectable ingredients were used to create restaurant-worthy soups.

In this convivial atmosphere, an impressive £110 was raised for CAFOD from 20 charitable attendees. The prior soup on Ash Wednesday raised £250 from 73 parishioners. A combined total of £360 was raised from St. Augustine’s. Well done!

Organise your own Soup Lunch in your parish

Money well spent!

The £360 from St. Augustine’s will be doubled to £720 by the UK Government with UKaid, making double the difference.  This money can be used for:

Matching your soup donations with UKaid this Lent 2018

Matching your soup donations with UKaid this Lent 2018

Peanut Seeds, £6 – Used to make nutritious peanut butter, a particular favourite of Svondo – a seven-year-old boy who is healthy, thanks to CAFOD’s partner who helped his mother, Marian.

Vegetable Garden, £28 – Myriad seeds needed for a family to plant a garden full of vegetables.

Health Workers, £97 – To train health workers and new mothers on how to identify malnutrition in children.

The  £720 raised by St. Augustine’s Catholic Church could buy 120 bags of peanut seeds or almost 26 vegetable gardens or educate over 7 health workers.

 

How to organise your own soup lunch

It is more simple than you may think to organise your very own soup lunch.

By clicking on this link, you will be taken to a PDF with three easy steps outlining how to hold a soup lunch.  Ensure that you have communicated with your priest and that you choose a specific day, with enough helpers to make the event run smoothly.  You may print posters to stick in your parish or local area which will inform others about your charitable day.

Soup Day 2

Parishioners enjoying the soup at St. Augustine’s

Matthew 25:40 – “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.” 

For help and more resources for this Family Fast Day:

Rejoice! Get together on Friday, 23rd February, to pray and fast

Marjorie Henry-Lawrence is a media volunteer with CAFOD, in the Diocese of Southwark – I am sharing with you why I will be attending CAFOD Family Fast Day on Friday 23rd February, at the Bishop Challoner School’s Chapel. 

Fast and Pray

Marjorie Henrie is a media volunteer with CAFOD Southwark

Marjorie Henrie is a media volunteer with CAFOD Southwark

What a wonderful opportunity to move from consumption to contemplation. Our fast will be a benefit to others, not by thinking ‘less of ourselves’ but thinking ‘about ourselves less’. To fast and pray has a transformative power, so do join us.

To go from the external stimulation of eating to the internal stimulation that comes from fasting and praying. For me, it’s a journey from doing to being – from action to thought.

Discover our power point to reflect on your lenten Fast in your parish 

Where, When, Why, Who –

Svondo, 7 years old, enjoying peanut butter. He is healthy. Thanks to CAFOD's partner who supported his mum, Marian with vegetables seeds and training..

Svondo, 7 years old, enjoying peanut butter. He is healthy. Thanks to CAFOD’s partner who supported his mum, Marian with vegetables seeds and training.

Where: Bishop Challoner School’s Chapel. 228 Bromley Road, Shortlands, BR2 0AB. (Free parking on Scotts Avenue, BR2 0LG).

Why: To reflect and share in small groups. To take part in a question and answers, as we rediscover the triumph of fasting, praying and reviewing bible passages alongside the Laudato si’.

When: Friday, February 23, from 12:30 – 1:30 for one hour.

Who: We are all called to take action in oneness and in love as we fast and pray.

Read more about fasting with CAFOD theology expert Susy

In the act of fasting we stand in solidarity with those who hunger – in so doing, we show our hunger and thirst for righteousness’ sake (Matthew 5:6). “Christian spirituality proposes an alternative understanding of the quality of life, and encourages a prophetic and contemplative lifestyle, one capable of deep enjoyment free of the obsession with consumption.” (#222, Laudato si’)

Confirm attendance if possible via (you can also just turn-up):